The hard work for any MMA fighter happens far away from the rings, and out of the public eye. We follow Evolve MMA fighter Alex Silva behind the scenes as he prepares for his ONE FC bout.
How does a fighter train? Alex Silva takes us behind the scenes at Evolve MMA during his preparation for ONE Fighting Championship 'Battle of Heroes' that was held on February 11 in Jakarta, Indonesia. The Brazilian Jiu Jitsu world champion gives us an insight into the gruelling regime that he and his teammate Rodrigo Ribeiro went through to be in peak fighting form.

Mixed Martial Arts (MMA) might look hard, and when fists and feet start to fly, someone is always going to get hurt. But ask any fighter and they will tell you that the hard work actually happens far away from stadiums and arenas and out of the public eye. The fans don't get their first glimpse of a fighter until he steps into the cage, ready to do battle against his opponent. What they don't see is the hours and hours of painstaking preparation which go on behind closed doors in order to ensure that, by the time the referee signals the start of the fight, he is well and truly ready.




FIGHTING TRAINING NEVERS STOPS
Silva, an Evolve instructor, says, "At Evolve MMA, the fight team trains all year round, regardless of whether we have a fight or not, but training is much more intense when preparing for a fight."

"People think that fighting is hard, but ask any fighter and they will tell you that the training is much, much harder. At Evolve MMA, I get pushed to my absolute limit. Sometimes I feel very tired but it is worth it because I know when I fight many people will be watching me on ESPN Star Sports and I want to be at my best."


ALEX SILVA'S DAILY TRAINING REGIME


"My training for this fight (ONE FC Battle of Heroes) began in December and this is what I do every day of the week except Sunday, when I rest. My coaches are all world champions and they push me hard. This timetable is just for martial arts training and does not include my strength and conditioning sessions," shares Silva.
9am to 11am
- 15 minute warm up drills
- 45 minute learn new technique and drills (MMA, BJJ, and Wrestling)
- 60 minute sparring (MMA, BJJ, and Wrestling)


2pm to 4pm
- 30 minute run
- 15 minute skipping rope
- 1 round x 5 minute of shadow boxing (Muay Thai and Boxing)
- 5 rounds x 5 minutes of padwork (Muay Thai and MMA)
- 1 round x 15 minutes of sparring (Muay Thai and MMA)
- 1 round x 15 minutes of Muay Thai clinching
- 1 round x 8 minutes of MMA circuit training


8pm to 9pm
- BJJ, Muay Thai, Boxing, or Wrestling